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ZOJ Problem Set - 4049
Halting Problem

Time Limit: 1 Second      Memory Limit: 65536 KB

In computability theory, the halting problem is the problem of determining, from a description of an arbitrary computer program, whether the program will finish running (i.e., halt) or continue to run forever.

Alan Turing proved in 1936 that a general algorithm to solve the halting problem cannot exist, but DreamGrid, our beloved algorithm scientist, declares that he has just found a solution to the halting problem in a specific programming language -- the Dream Language!

Dream Language is a programming language consists of only 5 types of instructions. All these instructions will read from or write to a 8-bit register $r$, whose value is initially set to 0. We now present the 5 types of instructions in the following table. Note that we denote the current instruction as the $i$-th instruction.

Instruction Description
add $v$ Add $v$ to the register $r$. As $r$ is a 8-bit register, this instruction actually calculates $(r + v) \mod 256$ and stores the result into $r$, i.e. $r \leftarrow (r + v) \mod 256$. After that, go on to the $(i + 1)$-th instruction.
beq $v$ $k$ If the value of $r$ is equal to $v$, jump to the $k$-th instruction, otherwise go on to the $(i + 1)$-th instruction.
bne $v$ $k$ If the value of $r$ isn't equal to $v$, jump to the $k$-th instruction, otherwise go on to the $(i + 1)$-th instruction.
blt $v$ $k$ If the value of $r$ is strictly smaller than $v$, jump to the $k$-th instruction, otherwise go on to the $(i + 1)$-th instruction.
bgt $v$ $k$ If the value of $r$ is strictly larger than $v$, jump to the $k$-th instruction, otherwise go on to the $(i + 1)$-th instruction.

A Dream Language program consisting of $n$ instructions will always start executing from the 1st instruction, and will only halt (that is to say, stop executing) when the program tries to go on to the $(n + 1)$-th instruction.

As DreamGrid's assistant, in order to help him win the Turing Award, you are asked to write a program to determine whether a given Dream Language program will eventually halt or not.

Input

There are multiple test cases. The first line of the input is an integer $T$, indicating the number of test cases. For each test case:

The first line contains an integer $n$ ($1 \le n \le 10^4$), indicating the number of instructions in the following Dream Language program.

For the following $n$ lines, the $i$-th line first contains a string $s$ ($s \in \{\text{"add"}, \text{"beq"}, \text{"bne"}, \text{"blt"}, \text{"bgt"}\}$), indicating the type of the $i$-th instruction of the program.

  • If $s$ equals to "add", an integer $v$ follows ($0 \le v \le 255$), indicating the value added to the register;

  • Otherwise, two integers $v$ and $k$ follow ($0 \le v \le 255$, $1 \le k \le n$), indicating the condition value and the destination of the jump.

It's guaranteed that the sum of $n$ of all test cases will not exceed $10^5$.

Output

For each test case output one line. If the program will eventually halt, output "Yes" (without quotes); If the program will continue to run forever, output "No" (without quotes).

Sample Input

4
2
add 1
blt 5 1
3
add 252
add 1
bgt 252 2
2
add 2
bne 7 1
3
add 1
bne 252 1
beq 252 1

Sample Output

Yes
Yes
No
No

Hint

For the second sample test case, note that $r$ is a 8-bit register, so after four "add 1" instructions the value of $r$ will change from 252 to 0, and the program will halt.

For the third sample test case, it's easy to discover that the value of $r$ will always be even, so it's impossible for the value of $r$ to be equal to 7, and the program will run forever.


Author: WENG, Caizhi
Source: The 2018 ACM-ICPC Asia Qingdao Regional Contest, Online
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